U.S. Army
4th Infantry Division, 12th Infantry Regiment, Company F
S/Sgt Robert D. Stacy 36107429
Killed In Action - June 6th 1944
Buried at: Plot D Row 12 Grave 24 Normandy American Cemetery
Colleville-sur-Mer, France
Grave marker, above photo.
Temporary graves were marked with a simple wooden cross with an identification plate attached to the
center. Once a permanent stone marker could be erected, the original wooden cross would be removed
and destroyed by incineration. This grave plate was found in Normandy France in the 1990s at the site of
the temporary marker destruction area.
HISTORY OF ROBERT D. STACY

Robert D. Stacy was born in 1915 and enlisted on March 25th 1941 in Detroit, Michigan.

The 12th Infantry Regiment was reorganized as a motorized infantry regiment on 29 September 1942.
Less than a year later, on 1 August 1943, the 12th was reorganized as a standard infantry regiment when
the 4th Division was converted from motorized to dismounted infantry. The Regiment along with the rest
of the 4th Infantry Division arrived in England on 29 January 1944. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 12th
Infantry saw its first action of the war when, as part of the 4th Infantry Division, it made an amphibious
assault landing on Utah Beach.

S/Sgt Robert D. Stacy was killed on the first day of the Normandy Invasion, June 6th 1944.

S/Sgt Stacy was buried at 607 Macon Cemetery (Utah Beach) on 9 June 1944.
(Weekly Burial Report, WBR 100.051 Burial Line 1011). S/Sgt Stacy was then disinterred and reburied 27
June 1944 at Ste. Mère-Eglise No. 2 Plot B-10-197 (WBR 106.174).  

Company Morning Report, 12th Infantry Regiment, June 9th 1944, shows S/Sgt Stacy as LWA (Lightly
Wounded in Action) and he was one of the first 12th Infantry Regiment men wounded.  S/Sgt Stacy was
the first Co F man who died of his wounds on June 6th 1944.
Grave markers Normandy American Cemetery Colleville-sur-Mer, France, above photo.
Temporary graves were marked with a simple wooden cross with an identification plate attached to the
center as shown in the above photo. This photo was taken behind Omaha Beach in 1951 by Life
Magazine, 6 years after World War Two at what is now known as the Normandy American Cemetery
Colleville-sur-Mer, France. Permanent stone markers were added several years later.
Company Morning Report, 12th Infantry Regiment, June 9th 1944, shows S/Sgt Stacy as LWA (Lightly
Wounded in Action) and he was one of the first 12th Infantry Regiment men wounded.  S/Sgt Stacy was
the first Co F man who died of his wounds on June 6th 1944.