WWII CRATES, BOXES AND CONTAINERS
PAGE 2
Small Arms Ammunition Crates, Signal Corps Photo 256084, June 6th 1944, above photo (via National
Archives, College Park, Maryland)
This photo shows T/Sgt. James W. Robbins of Mayfield, Kentucky and Private Walter L. Mahaffey of
Martinsville, Virginia with crates of ammunition, at the 687th Ordnance Company, Aversa Italy, June 6th 1944.
The crate to the left, marked 2000 CARTRIDGES, PISTOL BALL, CALIBER .45 M1911, IN CARTONS,
AMMUNITION LOT NUMBER WESTERN CARTRIDGE COMPANY 3284, was produced prior to 1941. The crate to
the right, marked 2000 CARTRIDGES, PISTOL BALL, CALIBER .45 M1911, IN CARTONS, AMMUNITION LOT
NUMBER WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS COMPANY 22124, was produced in 1943.
The crates, stacked in the background, contained: 960 CARTRIDGES, BALL, CALIBER .30M2, IN
BANDOLEERS, 5 RD. CLIPS, LOT F.A. (Frankfort Arsenal) 3717, 3728 and 3740. These lot numbers were
produced by Frankfort Arsenal between 1942 and 1943 when they transitioned from the Ball M1 cartridge to
the Ball M2 cartridge. The crates are painted chocolate brown with a red stripe, denoting Ball ammunition.
ORDNANCE CRATES
M1917 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX:
Reference for the marking of ammunition items for shipment: War Department Technical Manual 9-1901, page 32, paragraph d,
specifies "wooden packing boxes are painted or stained brown; markings in yellow".
Most World War II United States Ordnance crates were painted or stained a Chocolate Brown color prior to WWII, until
approximately 1943. At the mid-point of WWII natural colored crates were produced and issued, although, some Ordnance Plant
manufacturers continued to produced crates and ordnance packaging material painted in Chocolate Brown until the end of
WWII.
Variations in the applied crate markings consisted of yellow, black and white.

Ammunition Identification Code (AIC) of the Standard Nomenclature List, was used by the Army Ordnance Corps to list
munitions with a five part system consisting of numbers and letters to make ammunition easier for Soldiers to quickly identify.
This system started to be applied to all munitions crates in January 1942 and was used until 1958.
Small Arms Ammunition Crate, Signal Corps Photo 256085, June 6th 1944, above photo (via National Archives, College Park,
Maryland)
This photo shows Private Richard T. Millett, with tattoo on his arm and Quarter Master Distinctive Insignia pinned to his belt,
from #1 Brown Street, Worchester Massachusetts, with crate of ammunition, at the 687th Ordnance Company, Aversa Italy,
June 6th 1944.
This crate contained 1500 CARTRIDGES, TRACER, CALIBER .30 M1, IN CARTONS, AMMUNITION LOT NUMBER 7229, SAINT
LOUIS ORDNANCE PLANT. This M1917 Crate was produced in 1942 with natural wood and a yellow/green/yellow stripe for 75
Cartons, 20 Rounds per-Carton, of Tracer Ammunition.
The M1917 Ammunition Packing Box was a wooden box designed to be reused. The lid was secured by tightening wingnuts
over threaded metal posts in the walls of the chest. They were meant to be carried by means of handles milled into the ends of
the chest. Ammunition was shipped in boxes with a waterproof zinc metal lining that had the top soldered on to seal it. The
M1917 Ammunition Packing box came in two standard sizes.

There was a large packing box (Dimensions: 18-7/16" Length × 9-7/16" Width × 14-13/16" Height; Tare Weight: 9 lbs. Volume:
1.49 cubic feet) secured with 6 threaded posts (one on each end and two on each side). It was used to store and carry .30 and
.50 caliber ammunition.

The smaller box (Dimensions: 16-7/16" Length × 12-11/16" Width × 7-5/8" Height; Volume: 0.92 cubic feet) was secured with 4
threaded posts (one on each side). It was used for pistol and submachine gun ammunition. Another box (Volume: 0.83 cubic
feet) was used for carbine ammunition.

Pre-war and early-war chests were made of brown stained or painted wood with yellow lettering. In 1943, a system of colored
stripes across the middle of the long sides and lid to indicate the contents. Pistol, rifle and medium machine gun ammunition
had the stripes painted vertically on the long sides and lid and horizontally on the wide sides. Heavy machine gun ammunition
had the stripes painted diagonally on the long and wide sides and the lid.

Mid-to late-war chests were unstained with black painted lettering. They used the box's Ammunition Identification Code, or AIC,
code and a system of symbols to indicate the contents at a glance.
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, 1928, above photo.
This Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above, contained 900 M1 Metallic Links, Caliber .50. It was produced by
Frankford Arsenal, Lot Number 28, March 5th 1928, as stenciled on the reverse. The weight of this box is 56 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic
Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with black stenciling.
M1917 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, .50 CALIBER:
M1917 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, .30 CALIBER:
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, 1941, above left photo.
The Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 1500 Cartridges, Caliber .30 Ball M1, for Aircraft use
only, in Cartons: 20 cartridges per carton, 75 Cartons. It was produced by Frankford Arsenal, Lot Number 1426, in 1941 or
earlier. The weight of this box, stenciled on the rear, is 109 lbs. and although the Cubic Feet is not marked, it is the 1.5 CU FT.
size. The destination, marked on the rear, is for COMMANDER AIRCRAFT SQUADRON, MARINE BARRACKS, QUANTICO
VIRGINIA. It is painted chocolate brown with black stenciling. The vertical red stripe is for Ball Ammunition.

M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1EGN 1943, above right photo.
The T1EGN Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 1500 Cartridges, Caliber .30 Ball M2 in
Cartons: 20 cartridges per carton, 75 Cartons. It was produced by the Denver Ordnance Plant, Lot Number 32523-C, preloaded
in Ammunition Clips, in 1943. The weight of this box is 101 lbs. and although the Cubic Feet is obscured, it is the 1.5 CU FT.
size. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling. A vertical red stripe, for Ball Ammunition, is barely visible, which
could mean that this crate was produced prior to 1943 then repainted and reissued in 1943. The grey markings were applied
after WWII.
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1EGN 1943, above left photo.
The T1EGN Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 1500 Cartridges, Caliber .30 Ball M2 in
Cartons: 20 cartridges per carton, 75 Cartons. It was produced by the Denver Ordnance Plant, Lot Number 32306C, preloaded
in Ammunition Clips, in 1943. The weight of this box is 110 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow
stenciling. An additional AIC has been added under T1EGN: T1VGC.

M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1EGO 1943, above right photo.
The T1EGO Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 1500 Cartridges, Caliber .30 Ball M2 in
Cartons: 20 cartridges per carton, 75 Cartons. It was produced by the Winchester Repeating Arms, Lot Number 22589, in 1943.
The weight of this box is 106 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
T4 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, .45 CALIBER:
T4 Ammunition Packing Box, T2AAD 1943, above left photo.
The T2AAD T4 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 1800 Cartridges, Caliber .45 Ball M1911 in Cartons: 50
rounds per carton, 18 cartons per T1 waxed cardboard box, two T1 boxes per T4 Ammunition Packing Box. It was produced by
Evansville Chrysler Sunbeam Ordnance Plant (E.C.S.), Lot Number E.C.S. S24981, steel cased ammunition, in 1943. The weight
of this box is 92 lbs. and .74 Cubic Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.

T4 Ammunition Packing Box, T2AAD 1943, above right photo.
The T2AAD T4 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 1800 Cartridges, Caliber .45 Ball M1911 in Cartons: 50
rounds per carton, 18 cartons per T1 waxed cardboard box, two T1 boxes per T4 Ammunition Packing Box. It was produced by
Evansville Chrysler Ordnance Plant (E.C.), Lot Number E.C. S24994, steel cased ammunition, in 1943. The weight of this box is
92  lbs. and .74 Cubic Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1IGR, above left photo.
This T1IGR Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 240 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Ball M2, Linked - in
60 round cartons. It was produced by Saint Louis Ordnance Plant, Repacked Lot Number S.L.-L 8318. The weight and cubic
feet is obscured, but it should read 93 lbs. 1.5 CU FT. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling. The diagonal
ammunition stencil denotes steel linked cartridges. It is also stenciled FOR TRAINING USE IN CONTINENTAL U.S.

M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1IAG, above right photo.
This T1IAG Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 210 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Armor Piercing
M2, Linked. It was produced by Saint Louis Ordnance Plant and repacked by Remington Arms Company, Repacked Lot RA 5617
and S.L.-L 91972. The weight is 85 lbs. and 1.3 Cubic Feet, slightly smaller than the normal M1917 Ammunition Packing Box. It
is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling, done by the Saint Louis Ordnance Plant and a brighter yellow stenciling done
by the Remington Army Company during repacking. It was very common for ammunition to be repacked during WWII. The
single diagonal ammunition stencil denotes steel linked cartridges. It is also stenciled: FOR TRAINING USE IN CONTINENTAL
U.S.
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1IDD 1944, above left photo.
The T1IDD Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 350 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Armor Piercing
Incendiary M8 in Cartons: 10 Rounds per Carton, 35 Cartons. It was produced by Saint Louis Ordnance Plant, Lot Number S.L.
7176, in 1944. The weight of this box is 107 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.

M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, T1IRB 1944, above right photo.
The T1IRB Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 350 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Tracer M10 in
Cartons. It was produced by Saint Louis Ordnance Plant, Lot Number S.L. 7292, in 1944. The M10 Tracer replaced the previous
M1 Tracer, although M1 Tracer production continued into 1945. The weight of this box is 109 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic Feet. It is
painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
T2 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, .50 CALIBER:
T2 Ammunition Packing Box, T1IKC 1943, above photo.
This T1IKC T2 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above, contained 240 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Incendiary M1, in Cartons: 10
rounds per carton, 12 cartons per waxed cardboard box, 2 waxed cardboard boxes per T2 Ammunition Packing Box. It was
produced by Twin Cities Ordnance Plant, Lot Number T.W. 18840, in 1943. The weight is 75 lbs. and 1.12 Cubic Feet. It is
painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling. The T2 Ammunition Packing Box reduced the Cubic Feet required of the earlier
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box (1.5 Cubic Feet), but maintained the same capacity of being able to hold 240 Cartridges.
The T2 Ammunition Packing Box measures: 15" long, 13 3/4" wide and 9 1/4" tall.
Ammunition Packing Box, Ball M2 1942, above left photo.
The Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 960 Cartridges, Caliber .30 Ball M2 in Bandoleers, 5 round clips. It
was produced by Frankford Arsenal, Lot Number 3713. This lot number falls directly at the end of Ball M1 production in 1942,
but the crate is marked Ball M2. The weight and cubic feet are not listed on the box. The box measures 15 1/2" long, 13" wide
and 9 1/2" tall. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling and has a red stripe for Ball Ammunition. The rear is marked
1616-ORD. The exact crates are seen in the right photo with similar lot numbers. No AIC number has been assigned at this
point.

Small Arms Ammunition Crates, Signal Corps Photo 256084, June 6th 1944, above right photo (via National Archives, College
Park, Maryland)
This photo shows T/Sgt. James W. Robbins of Mayfield Kentucky and Private Walter L. Mahaffey of Martinsville Virginia with
crates of ammunition, at the 687th Ordnance Company, Aversa Italy, June 6th 1944.
The crates, stacked in the background, contained: 960 CARTRIDGES, BALL, CALIBER .30M2, IN BANDOLEERS, 5 RD. CLIPS,
LOT F.A. (Frankford Arsenal) 3717, 3728 and 3740. These lot numbers were produced by Frankford Arsenal between 1942 and
1943 when they transitioned from the Ball M1 cartridge to the Ball M2 cartridge. The crates are painted chocolate brown with a
red stripe, denoting Ball ammunition.
M1917 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, .30 CALIBER
CARBINE:
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, 1943, above photo.
The Small M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above, contained 3450 Cartridges, Caliber .30 Carbine Ball M1, in cartons. It
was produced by Lake City Ordnance Plant, Lot Number L.C. 12419, in 1943. The weight of this box is 110 lbs. and 1 Cubic
Foot. The box measures 16 1/2" long, 12 3/4" wide and 7 1/2" tall. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
M3 AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, .45 CALIBER:
M3 Ammunition Packing Box, T2AAF 1943, above photo.
The T2AAF M3 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above, replaced the earlier T4 Ammunition Packing Box in 1943. The M4
contained 1200 Cartridges, Caliber .45 Ball M1911 in Cartons: 50 rounds per carton, 12 cartons per metal M5 Ammunition Can,
two M5 Cans per M3 Ammunition Packing Box. It was produced by Evansville Chrysler Sunbeam Ordnance Plant (E.C.S.), Lot
Number E.C.S. S25033, steel cased ammunition, in 1943. This box was repacked by Evansville Chrysler (E.C.) in July 1944. The
weight of this box is 67 lbs. and .644 Cubic Feet. It is painted chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
AMMUNITION PACKING BOX, SHOTGUN:
Ammunition Packing Box, T3AGA Shotgun, above left photo.
The T3AGA Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 500 Shells, for the 12 Gauge Shotgun, #8 Chilled Shot, in
Cartons: 25 shells per carton, 20 cartons per wooden box. It was produced by Winchester Repeating Arms, Lot Number W.R.A.
22244. The weight of this box is 60 lbs. and .7 Cubic Feet. It is natural wood with yellow stenciling. Stencils were applied by
large machine rollers, prior to the assembly of the box. Wood, from a previous W.R.A. War Department contract, Lot Number
22239, has been reused and flipped inward on this box. Both outer sides of this box have the Lot Number 22224.
#6 and #8 Chilled Shot was used for trap shooting and gunnery practice.

Ammunition Packing Box, T3AGA Shotgun, above right photo.
The T3AGA Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 500 Shells, for the 12 Gauge Shotgun, #8 Chilled Shot, in
Cartons: 25 shells per carton, 20 cartons per wooden box. It was produced by Winchester Repeating Arms, Lot Number W.R.A.
22252. The weight of this box is 60 lbs. and .7 Cubic Feet. It is natural wood with black stenciling. #6 and #8 Chilled Shot was
used for trap shooting and gunnery practice.
M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, 1942, above left photo.
The Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above left, contained 350 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Armor Piercing M2 in
Cartons: 10 Rounds per Carton, 35 Cartons. It was produced by Saint Louis Ordnance Plant, Lot Number S.L. 8361, in 1942.
The weight of this box is 110 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic Feet. It is unpainted natural wood with black stenciling. The yellow/blue/yellow
band denotes Armor Piercing ammunition.

M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, 1943, above right photo.
The Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown above right, contained 350 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Incendiary M1 in Cartons:
10 rounds per Carton, 35 Cartons. It was produced by Twin Cities Ordnance Plant, Lot Number T.W. 18209, in 1943. The weight
of this box is 111 lbs. and 1.5 Cubic Feet. It is unpainted natural wood with black stenciling. The yellow/red/yellow band
denotes Incendiary ammunition.
Signal Corps Photo 255986, Marshall Island Campaign, January 1944 (via National Archives, College Park Maryland), above
photo.
These Soldiers, from the 7th Division, are loading .50 Caliber ammunition belts aboard USS Zeilin AP-9, on the way to the
Marshall's (Marshall Island Campaign - November 1943 through February 1944)
The Large M1917 Ammunition Packing Box, shown in the right of the photo, contained 350 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Armor
Piercing M2 in Cartons, produced by Saint Louis Ordnance Plant, Lot Number S.L. 9052, in 1943 and is unpainted natural wood
with black stenciling and the yellow/blue/yellow band denoting Armor Piercing ammunition. An additional box of 350 Cartridges,
Caliber .50 Tracer M1 in Cartons, is shown. This box is also unpainted natural wood with black stenciling and has the  
yellow/green/yellow band denoting Tracer ammunition.
These cartridges are being linked together with steel links in the M2 Link Loading Machine, prior to combat. Completed belts of
ammunition are seen in the foreground.
Signal Corps Photo 134575, Women Ordnance Workers (WOW's), May 1942, above photo (via National Archives, College Park,
Maryland)
This photo shows the final steps for closing the M1917 Ammunition Packing Box. These WOW's are lead sealing the inner steel
container to prevent moisture from getting onto the ammunition, applying the final repackage markings and then final sealing
of the lid for inspection and delivery.
These crates contained 1250 CARTRIDGES, BALL M2 & TRACER M1, CALIBER .30, in web belts. The Ball M2 Ammunition was
produced by Remington Army Company, Lot Number 5530, in 1942 and the Tracer M1 was produced by Frankford Arsenal, Lot
Number 902, in 1942. This M1917 Ammunition Packaging Box is painted chocolate brown with yellow stencils and a red vertical
stripe for the original Ball M1 ammunition, prior to repackaging.
AMMUNITION IDENTIFICATION CODE
STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LIST
GROUP T
SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION:
AMMUNITION IDENTIFICATION CODE
STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LIST
GROUP R
AMMUNITION FOR PACK, LIGHT AND MEDIUM
FIELD ARTILLERY:
Demolition Blocks M2 Crate, R7HCA 1945, above left photo.
This R7HCA crate originally contained: 16 Demolition Blocks M2, in two Haversacks, produced by Kingsbury Ordnance Plant,
Indiana, January 1945, LOT KOP 30-2, Weight 63 LBS. 1.3 Cubic Feet. The crate was produced in natural wood with black
stenciling. The crate markings were wartime factory over-painted in ordnance yellow and the contents re-designated for:
BLOCKS, DEMOLITION, 2 CHAINS, M1 IN 2 HAVERSACKS.

Demolition Blocks M3 Crate, R7HDA 1945, above right photo.
This R7HDA crate contained 16 BLOCKS, DEMOLITION M3 (COMPOSITION C-3), IN 2 HAVERSACKS, produced by Wabash
River Ordnance Works, Newport Indiana, January 1945, LOT WAB-6, Weight 44 LBS. GROSS, 36 LBS. NET, 0.81 Cubic Feet.
The crate was produced in natural wood with black stenciling.
BULK EXPLOSIVES:
Signal Corps Photo 131108, above left photo, via National Archives College Park Maryland.
April 1942, TNT Cones, or trinitrotoluene, fills the boxes on this workman's handcart at an Army Ordnance Department Arsenal.
He is about to haul the cones to a melt unit for re-liquifying the high explosive. The TNT liquid is then poured into ordnance
shells and then allowed to harden again into a solid form. The 50 lb. TNT and crates were produced by Trojan Powder Co.,
Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Signal Corps Photo 131110, above right photo, via National Archives College Park Maryland.
April 1942, pouring the liquid TNT from a bucket, a workman is loading 20-pound aircraft fragmentation bombs at an Army
Ordnance Department Arsenal. The same 50 lb. TNT crates, produced by Trojan Powder Co., Allentown, Pennsylvania, are in
the rear of this photo after delivery.
TNT Crate, Grade A, above left photo.
This WWII TNT crate was manufactured at Barksdale, Wisconsin. It contained 50 lbs. Net, 57 lbs. Gross, of Grade A TNT, Lot
4843, and also marked High Explosives Dangerous, Interstate Commerce Commission ICC-14.

TNT Crate, Grade 1, above right photo.
This WWII TNT crate was manufactured by Weldon Springs Ordnance Works, Weldon Springs Missouri, Contract No. W-ORD
482. It contained 50 lbs. Net, 58 lbs. Gross, of Grade 1 TNT, GRAINED. The Lot WLD number has been painted over with white
paint. It is also marked High Explosives - Dangerous, Interstate Commerce Commission ICC-14.
TNT Crate, Grade 1, above left photo.
This WWII TNT crate was manufactured by Plum Brook Ordnance Works, Sandusky Ohio, Contract Number W-ORD-496. It
contained 50 lbs. Net, 57 lbs. Gross, of Grade 1 TNT, Flaked. This Crate was Lend-Leased to Russia and marked OFSB 314,
SGPC, ORDER NO 21-73/L 42238, TRANS. NO. 66434, RASNOIMPORT, U.S.S.R.
Some of the markings have been over-painted in white and red.

TNT Crate, above right photo.
This WWII TNT crate was manufactured by Kankakee Ordnance Works, Joliet Illinois. It contained 50 lbs. Net, 58.5 lbs. Gross,
of TNT, FLAKED, Lot KNK-6617, Box 59429, Date APR 9 1945. It is also marked High Explosives - Dangerous, Interstate
Commerce Commission ICC-14. The front of the crate also bears the Ordnance Corps flaming bomb insignia.
Pentolite Crate, 50/50, above left photo.
Pentolite is a composite high explosive made of PETN (Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate), phlegmatized with TNT by melt casting.
This Pentolite 50/50 crate was produced by Radford Ordnance Works, Radford Virginia, 60 lbs Gross, 2.25 Cubic Feet, Box 33,
Lot RAD XXX (obscured), Packed March 1944. The front of the crate also bears the Ordnance Corps flaming bomb insignia.

Pentolite Crate, 50/50, above right photo.
Pentolite is a composite high explosive made of PETN (Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate), phlegmatized with TNT by melt casting.
This Pentolite 50/50 crate was produced by Radford Ordnance Works, Radford Virginia, 60 lbs Gross, 2.25 Cubic Feet, Box 397,
Lot RAD 735, Packed April 1944. The front of the crate also bears the Ordnance Corps flaming bomb insignia.
.22 Caliber Long Rifle Ammunition Crate, above left photo.
This .22 Caliber Ammunition Crate was produced by Federal Cartridge Corporation, Anoka Minnesota, and contained 10,000 Ball
Cartridges: 50 round cartons, 10 cartons per cardboard box, 20 cardboard boxes per wooden crate. Lot Number 1209,
manufactured in 1943, Weight 82 1/2 lbs., Contract Number W-271-ORD-4118, POF A-D-36115-3.
.22 Caliber Long Rifle ammunition was used to teach basic marksmanship before transitioning to full-bore service rifles.

.22 Caliber Long Rifle Ball Ammunition Crate, T1AAA, above right photo.
This .22 Caliber Ammunition Crate was produced by Winchester Repeating Arms Company, and contained 10,000 Ball
Cartridges: 50 round cartons, 10 cartons per cardboard box, 20 cardboard boxes per wooden crate. Lot Number WRA-22083.
.22 Caliber Long Rifle ammunition was used to teach basic marksmanship before transitioning to full-bore service rifles.
M1A1 Mine Crate, R7A1A 1943, above photo.
These R7A1A Mine Crates were produced by Elwood Ordnance Plant, Joliet Illinois in 1943. In late 1943, EOP transitioned from
a natural wood crate with yellow stenciling to black stenciling. Each crate contained five M1A1 Mines and five M1A2 Mine Fuzes
and were packed unassembled. The five dividers were painted half red to mark the minefield lanes during installation - red:
danger, natural color: safe. The dividers would be placed on the ground to show the direction of the minefield and then were
removed after all mines had been buried. The dividers could be moved inside of the crate for unassembled mines or fuzed
mines, with two sets of internal grooves. The M1A2 Mine Fuzes were stored in their own case prior to installation. The Weight
of the crate was 75 lbs. and 1.63 Cubic Feet.
60mm Mortar, M49A2 High Explosive Shell, Crate, R4CAC 1944, above left and right photos.
This R4CAC crate, left photo, was loaded by Wolf Creek Ordnance Plant (WC), Milan Tennessee in October 1944, Lot Number
WC-94-162. It contained ten rounds of 60mm M49A2 High Explosive Mortar Rounds, each shipped in their own individual fiber
packing tubes. The crate weighed 49 lbs. and 1 Cubic Foot. The crate was produced by Mortan Box Company, September 1944.
The crate is painted in chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
The R4CAC crate, right photo, was also produced by Wolf Creek Ordnance Plant, Lot Number WC-94-182, October 1944, but
was produced in natural wood with black stenciling. The crate was made by Newton Brothers Lumber Company, Tuscaloosa
Alabama, October 1944.
75mm Gun, M48 High Explosive Shell, Crate, R1ROA, above photo.
This R1ROA crate contained two fixed shells, 75mm High Explosive M48 with Point Detonating Fuze M48A2. The Lot Number
SOP-113-2, Weight 62 lbs., 1.16 Cubic Feet. The crate is natural colored wood with yellow stenciling.
This crate was restored by QuestMasters.
AMMUNITION IDENTIFICATION CODE
STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LIST
GROUP S
BOMBS, GRENADES AND PYROTECHNICS:
Rifle Grenade, Signal Ground Cluster M52A1, Red Star, Crate, S5RUA 1944, above photo.
This S5RUA crate was produced to hold forty-eight M52A1 Red Star Rifle Grenades, each in their own fiber container, Lot
USF-6-76, Loaded July 1944, Weight 81 lbs., 2.46 Cubic Feet. The crate was produced in chocolate brown painted wood with
yellow stenciling.
105mm Howitzer, M1 High Explosive Shell, Crate, R1QCA 1944, above two photos.
These two R1QCA crates both contained 2 semi-fixed shells, 105mm High Explosive M1 with Time & Super-Quick Detonating
Fuze M54. The Lot Number KN 9-41, Weight 120 lbs., 1.8 Cubic Feet. Both crates were produced in natural colored wood - and
even with the exact same Lot Number and date of manufacture, one has yellow stenciling and one has black stenciling. Both
crates have their original steel banding.
2.36 Inch Anti-Tank Rocket, M7A1 Practice, Crate, S9ADA 1943, above left photo.
This S9ADA crate was produced to hold twenty 2.36 Inch M7A1 Practice Rockets, each in their own fiber containers, produced
by Wolf Creek Ordnance Plant, Milan Tennessee, Lot Number WC-30-59, Packed November 1943, Weight 127.5 lbs., 3.7 Cubic
Feet. The crate was produced in natural wood with black stenciling, with a blue vertical stripe denoting practice munitions.

2.36 Inch Anti-Tank Rocket, M10 WP Smoke, Crate, S9AKA 1945, above right photo.
This S9AKA crate was produced to hold twelve 2.36 Inch M10 White Phosphorus Smoke Rockets, each in their own fiber
container, Lot EA-5-87, Loaded 1945, Weight 68 lbs., 1.73 Cubic Feet. The crate was produced in natural wood with black
stenciling. The Chemical Warfare Service corner markings are gray with a yellow band with the marking WP, for White
Phosphorus, and SMOKE. The crate was made by The Mengel Company Incorporated, Louisville Kentucky.
AN-M166 Variable Time (VT) Nose Fuze Container, S2MKC, above photo.
The S2MKC container held four AN-M166 Variable Time (VT) Bomb Nose Fuzes (previously designated the T51E1) with T2E1
Modified Arming Device. These were designed to be dropped from a minimum altitude of 3600 feet. The container was
produced by Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, Lot PA-456-27, Weight 59 lbs., 3.5 Cubic Feet. The container is painted olive-drab
with yellow stenciling.
The AN-166 VT Fuze was standardized in June 1945 for the 500 pound and larger aircraft bombs.
20mm Guns, T24 Practice Cartridge, Crate, R1AJA 1944, above left photo.
This R1AJA crate contained 20mm T24 Practice Shells, 120 rounds: 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 12
containers per crate. The crate was produced by Kingsbury Ordnance Plant, Indiana, Lot Number KOP 102418, Weight 95 lbs.,
1.45 Cubic Feet, Loaded November 1944. The crate was  produced in natural colored wood with black stenciling. The crate was
produced by Harvell Manufacturing Company, South Bend Indiana, November 1944.
This crate was restored by QuestMasters using the original markings that were impressed into the wood.

20mm Guns, High Explosive Incendiary Mk.I, R1ABS 1944, above right photo.
TM 9-1901 Artillery Ammunition, June 29th 1944, Chapter 01, page 34
M3 Anti-Personnel Mine Crate, R7AEA 1944, above two photos.
These two R7AEA crates both contained 6 Mines, M3 Anti-Personnel, with M3 Fuze and trip-wire. The left crate was produced
by Kingsbury Ordnance Plant, Indiana, Lot Number KOP-5-29, Packed 3-44 without a weight or cubic feet size listed. The mine
color is Olive-Drab.
The right crate does not have an AIC listed, the weight has not been added, .80 Cubic Feet and the Loaded Date and Lot
Number have not been added.
The M3 Anti-Personnel Mine was issued in SAND or OLIVE-DRAB paint, and the color listed on the outside of the crate.
Both of these crates were produced in natural wood with yellow stenciling.
81mm Mortar, M56 High Explosive Shell, Crate, R4FLB 1944, above photo.
This R4FLB crate was loaded by Iowa Ordnance Plant, Burlington Iowa, in December 1944, Lot Number IOP-8-45. It contained
two rounds of 81mm M56 High Explosive Mortar Rounds, each shipped in their own individual fiber packing tubes. The crate
weighed 42.5 lbs. and .92 Cubic Foot. The crate was produced by G.R.B.H. Rockford, Illinois November 1944. The crate is
natural wood with black stenciling.
AMMUNITION IDENTIFICATION CODE
STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LIST
GROUP P
AMMUNITION FOR HEAVY FIELD ARTILLERY AND
ANTI-AIRCRAFT WEAPONS:
40mm Anti-Aircraft Guns, MK.II HE-T Cartridge, Crate, P5HVA 1944, above photo.
This P5HVA crate contained six cartridges of 40mm MKII High Explosive Tracer, each contained in their own fiber shipping
tube. Each cartridge, produced for the Army, has a Point Detonating Mk.27 Navy Fuze. The crate was produced by Kingsbury
Ordnance Plant, Indiana, Lot Number KOP-7-11, M.V.2870, Weight 52 lbs., 1 Cubic Foot, Loaded November 1944. The crate was
produced in natural colored wood with black stenciling. The crate was produced by G-G.B.CO. Rockford, Illinois, November
1944.
37mm Guns, M63 High Explosive Cartridge, Crate, 1943, above left photo.
This crate contained twenty 37mm M63 High Explosive Shells, each packed in their own fiber container. The crate was
produced with the Lot Number OA-3-40, without a weight, 2 Cubic Feet, Packed February 1943. The crate was produced in
natural colored wood with black stenciling.
This crate does not have an AIC code listed on it, but it would be in Group R1H.

Signal Corps Photo 178672, September 1943, via National Archives College Park Maryland, above right photo.
"Viola Defibaugh and Dorothy Smith give 37mm Ammunition a start down the roller conveyor that will take it from their truck to
a storage igloo at Letterkenny Ordnance Depot, September 1943."
These 37mm crates, produced by Picatinny Arsenal, are marked: 20 ROUNDS, CANNISTER M2, PA-81 37G"
4.2 Inch Chemical Mortar, Crate, above two photos.
The crate, pictured left, originally contained 2 rounds of 4.2 Inch Chemical Mortar, White Phosphorus Shells. This crate was
produced in March 1943, Lot KN (number obscured), Weight 43 lbs., 1.56 Cubic Feet with destination stencil: FOR
1804-CWS-DEPOT. This crate was found in the town of San Pietro, Italy after the battle that took place there in December 1943.
It was produced in natural wood with black stenciling with blue corner markings for Chemical Warfare Service overseas
shipping.
This crate does not have an AIC code listed on it, but it would be in Group R4N.

The crate, pictured right, originally contained 2 rounds of 4.2 Inch Chemical Mortar White Phosphorus Shells with M-6
Propellant. This crate was produced by Pine Bluff Arsenal, Stock Number 213150, Lot Number PB 501-109, August 1945, Weight
68 lbs., 1.1 Cubic Feet. The crate has the grey with blue corner markings for Chemical Warfare Service overseas shipping as
well as gray with a yellow bar for White Phosphorus Smoke.
This crate does not have an AIC code listed on it, but it would be in Group R4N.
57mm Rifle, T23 White Phosphorus Smoke Cartridge, Crate, 1945, above photo.
This crate contained four 57mm T23 White Phosphorus Smoke Shells, each packed in their own fiber container. This crate was
manufactured in March 1945 by Picatinny Arsenal, Dover N.J., Lot PA-43-2-X, Weight 42 lbs., .96 Cubic Feet. The crate was
produced in natural wood with black stenciling.
The 57mm T15E9, re-designated the M18, Recoilless Rifle was operationally introduced to the battlefield in early 1945 and saw
service in both Europe and the Pacific. This crate is for the T23, or Test designation version of the early production shell that
was later be designated the M308, White Phosphorus Smoke Shell.
This crate does not have an AIC code listed on it, but it would be in Group R1J.
Mk. II Fragmentation Hand Grenade, High Explosive, Crate, 1942, above left photo.
This crate, above left, was produced to hold twenty-five Mk.II Hand Grenades and was later remarked Mk.IIA1. The crate was
packed October 1942, Lot 13-23301-49, Weight 57 lbs. The manufacturer is not listed. This crate is one of the earliest Hand
Grenade Crates of WWII, produced during the first year of war. The original designation of the fragmentation (defensive) Hand
Grenade developed during WWI was the Mk.I. This design failed before WWI concluded. The next design, the Mk.II is
identifiable by the lead filling screw at the bottom of the cast grenade body, utilizing the M10A2 fuze. These grenades were
painted ordnance yellow. The crate shown, above left, started out in production as the Mk.II with M10A2 fuze but has been
re-marked with the new production variation of the fragmentation Hand Grenade the Mk.IIA1 with M10A3 fuze. The Mk.IIA1 had
a solid bottom without a filling screw. Production started with ordnance yellow painted grenades transitioning to olive drab with
a yellow band during 1943. The crate was produced in natural wood with black stenciling. The earlier markings have been
painted over in black paint with the new October 1942 markings applied.
This crate does not have an AIC code listed on it, but it would be in Group S4G.

M-21 Practice Hand Grenade Crate, S4GGA 1944, above right photo.
This S4GGA crate, above right photo, contained twenty-five Practice M-21 Hand Grenades with M10A3 Fuzes was
manufactured in August 1944, Lot Number EA-3-16, Weight 55 lbs., 1.26 Cubic Feet. The crate was produced in natural wood
with yellow stenciling and has the blue band across vertically across the center and on each end support, denoting practice
munitions.
M-14 Incendiary Thermite Hand Grenade Crate, 1942 and 1943, above left and right photo.
This crate, above left, was manufactured by Triumph Explosives in December 1942 and contained twenty-five Incendiary
(Thermite) AN-M-14 Grenades, each in their own fiberboard containers, Lot Number 6, Weight 71 lbs., 1.4 Cubic Feet. The crate
was produced in natural wood with black stenciling and has the gray and purple corner markings for Chemical Warfare Service
overseas shipping, Thermite.

This crate, above right, was manufactured in January 1943 and contained twenty-five Incendiary (Thermite) M-14 Grenades
with M200A1 Fuzes, each in their own fiberboard containers, Lot Number 2, Weight 72 lbs., 1.44 Cubic Feet. The crate was
produced in natural wood with black stenciling and has the gray and purple corner markings for Chemical Warfare Service
overseas shipping, Thermite.
Mk. IA1 Training Hand Grenade Crate, S4MAA, above photo.
This S4MAA crate, above photo, originally contained 25 Practice Mk.IA1 Grenades. The Mk.IA1 was a solid cast-iron training
grenade that did not contain any moving parts or an explosive element. The Lot Number and Date Packed are blank. The crate
was produced in natural wood with black stenciling.
M23A1 Rifle Grenade, Red Smoke, Crate, S4FGA, above left photo.
This S4FGA crate was produced to hold ten M23A1 Red Smoke Rifle Grenades, each contained in their own fiberboard  
container, Lot Number OAP 11-17. The crate was produced in natural wood with black stenciling. The Chemical Warfare Service
corner markings are gray with a yellow band.

M9A1 Rifle Grenade Crate, S4NBC 1945, above right photo.
This S4NBC crate was produced to hold ten M9A1 Rifle Grenades, each in their own fiberboard container, Lot GR 7-81, Loaded
August 1945, Weight 31.3 lbs., .95 Cubic Feet. The crate was produced in natural wood with black stenciling.
Signal Corps Photo 137856, June 25th 1942, via National Archives College Park Maryland, above photo.
This photo shows a demonstration for the Chief of Ordnance at Camp Simms, Washington D.C., June 25th 1942, showing the
new container for the Anti-Tank Rocket T-1 (Test Rocket 1), which would become the M6 Anti-Tank Rocket. The crate has been
re-marked to hold ten T-1 Rockets, with the Lot Number 23303-A, Packed June 1942. The crate is natural wood with black
stenciling. The T-1 Rocket in the foreground is painted ordnance yellow, for High Explosive ordnance, with black stenciling.
Signal Corps Photo 178667, above photo, via National Archives College Park Maryland.
"Mrs. Ruth Knerr, one of an all-woman box factory crew at Plum Brook Ordnance Works, Sandusky Ohio, has a son in the
Navy. He is watching out for ammunition boxes made by his mother. September 1943."
Mrs. Knerr uses a wood hand-planer to trim the edge on a newly manufactured TNT, trinitrotoluene, crate. As a Woman's
Ordnance Worker, or WOW, she wears the WOW headscarf or bandanna, with white flaming ordnance bombs on red fabric.
The WOW bandanna was considered an official part of their uniform as an Ordnance Worker.
3 Inch Gun, M42A1 H.E. Cartridge, Crate, P5MSB 1944, above photo.
TM 9-1901 Artillery Ammunition, June 29th 1944, Chapter 01, page 35
155mm Howitzer, T76E9B Point Detonating Fuze, Container, R3FSA 1945, above photo.
This R3FSA container held twelve Point Detonating Fuzes T76E9B for the 155mm Howitzer, 8 Inch Howitzer and 240mm
Howitzer, Lot 2134, Weight 67 lbs., 1.55 Cubic Feet.
The olive green painted container with yellow stenciling is stamped: AMMUNITION COMPONENT BOX MK.I, PARKER
WOLVERINE CO. 1945, NOrd-6614 INSP.R.V.
75mm Howitzer, M48 High Explosive Cartridge, "Lobster" Shipping Crate, R1MLA 1943, above photo.
This R1MLA "Lobster Crate" or bundle, contained three 75mm Howitzer M48 High Explosive Shells and Casings, in individual
fiberboard shipping tubes.
This replica was made by QuestMasters.
8 Inch Howitzer M1, M2 Propelling Charges - White Bag, Crate, P2OBE 1944, above photo.
This P2OBE crate contained two M2 Propelling Charges - White Bag, for the 8 Inch M1 Howitzer, PROJ 200 LBS M V 1950 F S,
HSR October 1944, Lot 17473-44, Weight 109 lbs., 3.96 Cubic Feet.
The crate was made by Weaver Lumber & Plywood Company, Jacksonville Mississippi October 1944.
155mm Howitzer, M4A1 Propelling Charge - White Bag, Crate, R2MCF, above photo.
This R2MCF crate contained two M4A1 Propelling Charges - White Bag for the 155mm M1 Howitzer, loaded October 1944, Lot
IND 17221, Weight 61.5 lbs., 2.28 Cubic Feet. The crate was produced in natural colored wood with black stenciling.
This crate was recovered by QuestMasters in 1998 from Bastogne, Belgium.
M12 AMMUNITION CRATE, .50 CALIBER:
M12 Ammunition Crate, T1IDR 1944, above photo.
This T1IDR M12 Ammunition Crate, shown above, contained 120 Cartridges, Caliber .50 Armor Piercing Incendiary M8, in
Cartons: 10 rounds per carton, six cartons per M10 Ammunition Can, two M10 Ammunition Cans per M12 Ammunition Crate. It
was produced by Lake City Ordnance Plant, Lot Number LC 12520, in 1944. The weight is 43 lbs. and .7 Cubic Feet. It is painted
chocolate brown with yellow stenciling.
ENEMY ORDNANCE TRAINING AND
FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE CRATES:
Japanese Mine Training Aid Set No. 2, above two photos.
This mine training set was produced for the U.S. Corps of Engineers during WWII to aid in the identification and handling of
Japanese WWII mines. This crate, as well as all of the contents, were produced in the United States during WWII from original
Japanese examples. No actual Japanese ordnance was supplied with the set. The crate is stenciled on the side: 1-ST. MINE
TRAINING, AID NO.2 JAPANESE, SNL.00-0586.000-020
The set contained a Japanese Type 93 Anti-Tank Mine, Magnetic Mine, Yardstick Mine, Type 97 Hand Grenade and Type 3 Land
Mine. The Yardstick Mine was provided with four fuzes and simulated explosive blocks on the inside of the mine. The set also  
included a manual: TB ENG 79, WAR DEPARTMENT TECHNICAL BULLETIN, USE OF JAPANESE MINE TRAINING AID SET NO.
2, dated June 1945.
These sets were useful during the closing days of WWII and during post-WWII battlefield ordnance removal.
The Type 97 Hand Grenade is missing from this set.
Captured German Ordnance Intelligence Equipment, above photo.
This German WWII crate was captured by the United States and prepared for shipment back to the United States for foreign
material evaluation. The crate is marked: TO COMMANDING GENERAL, ABERDEEN MARYLAND, ABERDEEN PROVING
GROUND, FOREIGN MATERIAL BRANCH, USA ORD-V-SE-382 E 323SO, FROM DEPOT O-609 SOISSONS/FRANCE, CU. FT. 4.42
WT. 75 LBS. GERMAN
Ordnance Technical Intelligence Teams (OTIT) were responsible for capturing and identifying enemy material for shipment
back to the United States and Great Britain for material evaluation. OTIT Depot O-609 was located in Soissons, France, which
was located between Paris, France and Belgium.
M1A1 Mine Crate, R7A1A June 1943, above photo.
This R7A1A Mine Crate was produced in June 1943, with the Lot Number IL-10-39, Weight 79 lbs., 1.45 Cubic Feet. The crate
was produced in natural wood with white stenciling. This Lot Number series and dates, during the summer of 1943, are the only
M1A1 Mine Crates observed with white stenciling. Later, similar series, Lot Numbers were marked in yellow, with the main
stencil in white.
This crate was found in Kunar, Afghanistan, in 2010, having been re-painted green and re-marked in yellow for a Cratering
Charge, March 1953. The post-WWII paint was carefully removed by QuestMasters and is shown above.
M15 Grenade Launch Sight Shipping Cardboard Box, 1944, above photo.
This cardboard box, produced in June 1944 by the Container Corporation of America, Rock Island Illinois, contained fifty M15
Grenade Launcher Sights, Drawing Number C7310089, SNL No. B-39-7310089; fifty Carrying Cases, Drawing Number D7160198,
SNL No. 24-C-533-75; one Drill Jig, Drawing Number C7310066, SNL No. 41-J-361; twelve Mounting Plate Screws, Drawing
Number A7310009; two Number 29 Drills and on Technical Bulletin, TB23-30-1 Western Newell Manufacturing Company,
Freeport Illinois.
37mm Mk. IV Signal Cartridges, Cardboard Inner Packing Box, Green Tracer - Red Green, above photo.
This wax covered inner packing box was produced by The Kilgore Manufacturing Company (I.F.S.) in 1944, Lot 249 for ten
37mm Signal Cartridges Mk. IV, Green Tracer Red Green. This cartridge was used in the AN-M8 Signal (Flare) Pistol.
Although unmarked, this box would be in AIC SNL Group S5P.
37mm Mk. IV Signal Cartridges, Cardboard Packing Box, Green Tracer - Red Green, above photo.
This cardboard packing box was produced by The Hercules Box Company, Columbus Ohio for The Kilgore Manufacturing
Company I.F.S. Division in April 1944, Lot 249, for fifty 37mm Signal Cartridges Mk. IV, Green Tracer Red Green. This cartridge
was used in the AN-M8 Signal (Flare) Pistol.
Although unmarked, this box would be in AIC SNL Group S5P.
AMMUNITION IDENTIFICATION CODE
STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LIST
GROUP K:
Pistol and Rifle Cleaning Patch Cardboard Box, 1943, above left photo.
This Cleaning Patch Cardboard Packaging Box contained 10,000 2 1/2 inch by 2 1/2 inch cotton cloths, used to clean weapons.
It was produced by the Sample Card Company of America, Weight 14 lbs., SNL K-1.

Rifle Bore Cleaner Cardboard Box, 2-ounce cans, 1944, above right photo.
This box is marked 96 2-OZS CLEANER-RIFLE BORE SNL___________ GR.WT.24.25 CU.FT.0.6.
This box was produced in March 1944.
The yellow corner markings are applied to containers for overseas shipment. Yellow corners denoted "Bulk Supplies and
Equipment, Ordnance".
155mm Howitzer, M2 Propelling Charge - White Bag, Cloverleaf Bundle, above left photo.
These 155mm Howitzer Cloverleaf Bundles were fabricated by QuestMasters using original cloverleaf caps with connecting
rods and fiberboard tube end caps, recovered from California in 2016, from operations conducted in the desert during training
in  WWII. The replica fiber tubes are constructed from cardboard, wrapped in asphalt impregnated paper, as were the originals.
The fiber tube end caps are marked: 2 - CHARGES, PROPELLING, M2 (WHITE BAG) FOR 155 MM. HOW. M1917, M1917A1 &
M1918, R.R.C. CONTAINER, 155MM, M44.

155mm Howitzer, M1A1 Propelling Charge - Green Bag, Fiberboard Tubes, above right photo.
These 155mm Howitzer Fiberboard Tubes were fabricated by QuestMasters using original fiberboard tube end caps, recovered
from California in 2016, from operations conducted in the desert during training in WWII. The replica fiber tubes are
constructed from cardboard, wrapped in asphalt impregnated paper, as were the originals. The fiber tube end caps are marked:
2 - CHARGES, PROPELLING, M1A1 (GREEN BAG) FOR 155 MM. HOW. M1917, M1917A1 & M1918, R.R.C. CONTAINER, 155MM,
M46. The five increment green charge bags are also a replica.
60mm Mortar, M49A2 High Explosive Shell, Cloverleaf Bundle, above photo.
This 60mm Mortar Cloverleaf Bundle was fabricated by QuestMasters using original cloverleaf caps with connecting rods and
fiberboard tube end caps, recovered from California in 2016, from operations conducted in the desert during training in WWII.
The replica fiber tubes are constructed from cardboard, wrapped in asphalt impregnated paper, as were the originals. Each
Fiber Tube held six M49A2 60mm High Explosive Mortar Shells with M52 Fuzes. The fiber tube end caps are marked: 60MM
MORTAR M1 & M2, (6 ROUNDS) CONTAINER 60MM M51.
81mm Mortar, M43A1 High Explosive Shell, Cloverleaf Bundle, above photo.
This 81mm Mortar Cloverleaf Bundle was fabricated by QuestMasters using original cloverleaf caps with connecting rods and
fiberboard tube end caps, recovered from California in 2016, from operations conducted in the desert during training in WWII.
The replica fiber tubes are constructed from cardboard, wrapped in asphalt impregnated paper, as were the originals.
The fiber tube end caps are marked: 81MM MORTAR M1 AND 3IN.T.M., MKIA1, CONTAINER, 81MM M36 and another set of
caps: MORTARS, 81MM, MI AND 3 IN. MK.IA2, CONTAINER 81MM M36A1.
105mm Howitzer, Lobster Crate and Cloverleaf Bundles, R1QCB, above photo.
These 105mm Howitzer Cloverleaf Bundles were fabricated by QuestMasters using original cloverleaf caps with connecting
rods and fiberboard tube end caps, recovered from California in 2016, from operations conducted in the desert during training
in  WWII. The original fiber tube end cap is marked: 105 MM. HOW M2, CONTAINER. 105 MM, M39A1.
FACTORY PACKAGING, BOXES AND CONTAINERS:
Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines, Parts Boxes, above photo.
These colorful blue and red boxes were produced by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engine Corporation, Division of United Aircraft
Corporation, to hold spare parts needed for engine maintenance and repair during WWII. One box is marked: QUANTITY 3,
PART NUMBER 50530, PART NAME FACING-HIGH RATIO CLUTCH and another box: PART NO. 50550, PART NAME SHAFT
ASSY, QTY. 1, CONTRACT NO. NFAX 42000.
Rifle Bore Cleaner Shipping Box, 6-ounce cans, 1943, above left photo.
This Rifle Bore Cleaner Shipping Box was produced by Banner Manufacturing Company Incorporated, Brooklyn New York,
under Contract Number W-41-ORD-17159, Purchase Order Number 43-18171, 1.4 Cubic Feet, Spec. RIXS 205 Rev. The crate
contained seventy-two 6-ounce cans in six inner packing boxes, each inner packing box containing 12 cans.

Rifle Bore Cleaner 6-ounce Can, above right photo.
This Rifle Bore Cleaner, Specification RIXS-205 Revision 1, Purchase Order 43-18171, was produced by Banner Manufacturing
Company Incorporated, Brooklyn New York.
Rifle Bore Cleaner, Inner Packing Box, 2-ounce cans, 1943, above left photo.
This Rifle Bore Cleaner Inner Packing Box was produced by The Hinde and Dauch Paper Company, Sandusky Ohio, V Board
Grade 3, Type C, December 1943. The box contained twenty-four 2-ounce cans.

Rifle Bore Cleaner, Inner Packing Box, 2-ounce cans, 1944, above center photo.
This Rifle Bore Cleaner Inner Packing Box was produced by The Hinde and Dauch Paper Company, Sandusky Ohio, V Board
Grade 3, Type C, February 1944. The box contained twenty-four 2-ounce cans.

Light Preservative Lubricating Oil, Inner Packing Box, 2-ounce cans, 1944, above right photo.
This Light Preservative Lubricating Oil Inner Packing Box was produced by The Hinde and Dauch Paper Company, Sandusky
Ohio, V Board Grade 3, Type C, March 1944. The box contained twenty-four 2-ounce cans, Ordnance Department AXS-702
(REV. 1).