"Griswold" Weapons Case, two above photos.
The Griswold Weapons Case was designed to protect the paratrooper's weapon while descending. The case consisted of a
jute padded inside layer sewn to a khaki or olive drab canvas shell. The case shown above was produced in the second half
of 1944 and is known as the 2nd pattern. This case was originally made to hold a disassembled M-1 Garand Rifle, but has
been modified by a Parachute Rigger to hold an assembled M-1 Thompson Sub-Machinegun. This modification was done by
adding the green canvas extension to the end of the bag. The rear of the bag has the part number 8300 - 44 2650. The dotted
rectangle on the rear of the bag is where the attachment hook was sewn for attaching the bag to the parachutist's gear. The
hook on this bag has been removed.
United States
Douglas C-47A "Skytrain" Cargo Aircraft
A.A.F. Serial Number 43-15137
M9A1 Rifle Grenades, above left photo.
Shown here are the special grenade cartridges that were issued with the rifle grenades. There were several different service
rifles that were issued during WWII and each caliber of cartridge was issued with the grenades. Each crate contained 10
Cartridges Caliber .30M3, 6 Cartridges Caliber .30M6 and 5 Cartridges M7.
S4NBC Crate, above right photo.
The S4NBC crate contained 10 M9A1 Anti-Tank Grenades with Cartridges. This crate is dated August 1945.
Caliber .30 M1 Ammunition Box, above left photo.
Each ammunition box was stenciled with the type of ammunition that was loaded inside. The box shown on the top is loaded
with 250 rounds of .30 Caliber ammunition. This load consists of 4 Armor Piercing (AP) rounds followed by 1 Tracer (TR)
round. This pattern continued for all 250 rounds. The box shown on the bottom is loaded with 250 rounds of .30 Caliber
ammunition. This load consists of 4 Ball rounds followed by 1 Tracer (TR) round. This pattern continued for all 250 rounds.

Ammunition can manufacturer markings, above right photo.
Shown here are five different manufacturer markings: CROWN (two font styles), CANCO, REEVES and SFC.
Also noteworthy are the different styles of hinges.
Type A-1 Aerial Delivery Container
Identification Lamp Assembly, left
photo.
The Type A-1 Lamp was used to
mark the Parapack when deployed
at night. The light aided the
paratroopers to find and identify
the equipment on the ground. Blue
lights were used for chemical
warfare equipment, Red lights were
used for engineer equipment (Ex:
mines), Amber lights were used for
ordnance equipment (Ex:
ammunition) and Green lights were
used for rations and water. The
lamp color also corresponded to
the same color of parachute.
Rebecca AN-148 Antenna, above photos.
The C-47 used two AN-148 Antennas during the Normandy Invasion. One AN-148 was mounted on each side of the cockpit
just below the pilot's window. The AN-148 Antenna was used to receive the
Eureka radio signal sent by the Pathfinders that
landed just prior to the main Airborne landing. This signal was received by the
Rebecca system mounted on board the C-47.
CARGO - Parapacks
The C-47 "Skytrain" could carry up to six Parapacks or Paracaissons per flight.
These containers were dropped with the paratroopers and held the heavier equipment that would be needed
on the ground during the initial assault.
The A-4 and A-5 Aerial Delivery Container were two types of delivery containers that were used by the
Airborne Divisions.
FORM B PARACHUTE, above photo.
The section pictured above is from the original manifest for C-47A 43-15137 for June 6th 1944. This manifest
was known as the Form B Parachute. The document contained the aircraft number, chalk number, mission,
crew, date, paratrooper names and cargo. It is signed by the chalk leader Lt. James F. Clarke.
"Chalk 40" carried four containers on June 6th 1944.
Container 1: Light Machine Gun (LMG) & Ammunition, 230 pounds
Container 2: LMG Ammunition & Anti-Tank (AT) Grenades, 220 pounds
Container 3: LMG Ammunition & Anti-Tank (AT) Grenades, 221 pounds
Container 4: S-4 Bundle (Rations), 150 pounds
FORM B PARACHUTE, above photo.
The section pictured above is from the original manifest for C-47A 43-15137 for September 17th 1944. It is signed by the
chalk leader Lt. Fred Anderson Jr.
"Chalk 76" carried four containers on September 17th 1944.
Container 1: Mines, 250 pounds, Red Parachute
Container 2: Rations, 175 pounds, Green Parachute
Container 3: Mines, 250 pounds, Red Parachute
Container 4: 81mm Mortar Ammunition, 200 pounds, Red Parachute
A-4 Aerial Delivery Container, above photo.
This pictures shows some of the combined equipment that would have been carried in the four delivery
containers on "Chalk 40" during June 6th 1944: M-1919A4 Light Machine Gun, .30 Caliber Ammunition and
M9A1 Anti-Tank Rifle Grenades.
C-47 AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT
Silk Map, left photo.
Maps of Europe were printed
on silk or fabric material of
Europe for the aircrew flying
over and paratroopers
dropping into France. These
maps were specifically printed
on fabric so that no noise was
made when using them or
damage caused to the map in
the event of them getting wet.
There were several maps made
specifically for the Invasion:
the A/B, C/D and E/F maps.
The C/D map with fabric case
is pictured to the left.
JUNE 6th 1944 - NORMANDY FRANCE:
SEPTEMBER 17th 1944 - HOLLAND:
A-5 Delivery Container, above left and right photo.
The A-5 Delivery Container consisted of a left end and a right end. The center section consisted of parachute webbing that
would be secured over the cargo or a modified "Griswold" weapons case made into a center section. The markings on each
end state: TYPE A-5 AERIAL DELIVERY CONTAINER CAUTION MUNITIONS. The end of one cover is marked: CO. F for
Company F, 2nd Battalion.
OTHER PARATROOPER GEAR:
Eureka MX-183/PPN-2 Bag, left photo.
The
Eureka system was a simple beacon designed to initially assist in
the delivery of supplies to the Army or Resistance in occupied Europe.
The
Rebecca system was mounted on aircraft designed to radiate a
pulse signal. The interrogating pulse would be received by the PPN
Eureka beacon located on the ground target causing a response to the
Rebecca receiver. This signal was displayed on the cathode ray tube
located on the aircraft. This system was used by the United States as
well as Great Britain. The earliest version of the ground based
Eureka
beacon was known as the PPN-1.

The MX-183/PPN-2 jute lined khaki canvas bag shown on the left is for
the PPN-2. This bag was used by Airborne troops to deploy the PPN-2
during transit and delivery to the ground. The PPN-2 was designed in
1944 and used after the June 6th 1944 invasion of Normandy France.
The PPN-2 operated in the 214-234 Megacycle (Mega-Hertz, MHz)
frequency on 5 different channels. The beacon was designated
RT-37/PPN-2 with aerial AS-73/PPN-2.
C-47 Load Adjuster Case, above left and right photo.
Each C-47 "Skytrain" aircraft was issued a load adjuster and leather storage case. The load adjuster was used by the crew to
balance the aircraft load prior to flight. This case is marked for the C-47, C-47A and Navy R4D-1&5. The front of the case is
serial numbered 112222.
Westinghouse Paratrooper Helmet Liner, above left and right photo.
During World War Two two, types of helmets were primarily worn by U.S. Paratroopers: the M-2 Helmet and the M-1C
Helmet. Both helmets used the same style of helmet liner. The liner shown above was made by Westinghouse and could be
used with either the M-2 or the M-1C Helmet. The Westinghouse manufactured liners had specific characteristics: Triple
Herringbone Twill (THBT) khaki suspension and Olive Drab Number 7 (OD#7) "A" Yokes with green painted cast steel
buckles to support the leather chin cup. The paratrooper liner also has female snaps on both sides above the "A" yoke to
attach the end of the chin strap on the steel helmet to the helmet liner. The Westinghouse logo can be found on the top
inside of the helmet liner.
M-1C Paratrooper Helmet, above left and right photo.
The M-1C Paratrooper Helmet differed from the M-2 Helmet by the configuration of the helmet bales, or the area where the
chin strap attached to the helmet. The M-2 Helmet used "D" shaped bales while the M-1C used fixed bales that were more
square. The M-2 bales were prone to breaking off so the M-1C was developed. The liner on this helmet is made by Inland,
which has specific chacteristics: Single Herringbone Twill (SHBT) khaki suspension and Olive Drab Number 3 (OD#3) "A"
Yokes with black wire formed steel buckles to support the leather chin cup. The paratrooper liner also has female snaps on
both sides above the "A" yoke to attach the end of the chin strap on the steel helmet to the helmet liner. The Inland logo can
be found on the top inside of the helmet liner. This helmet has been repainted several times during its service life.
M-1C Helmet Chin Straps, left photo.
The chin straps pictured on the left are from the M-1C Helmet
pictured above. The M-2 and M-1C Helmet used the exact same
chin strap. Note the male snaps that would be used to attach the
steel helmet to the inside of the helmet liner.
International Shoe Company Paratrooper Boots, above left and right photo.
The Paratrooper Boots were a unique feature of the Airborne Soldier, but were not limited to issue to only the Airborne. The
Engineer Special Brigade (ESB), Navy Combat Demolition Unit (NCDU) and 1st Special Service Force (1SSF) also wore this
style of boot. The boots pictured above have 12 eyelets for laces and were produced in a russet brown leather. A unique
feature of the Paratrooper Boot is the angled edge of the boot heal toward the arch. This angle was added so that the boot
heal would not catch on the parachute shroud lines during exit from the aircraft. These boots were produced by the
International Shoe Company, July 26th 1943. On the inside of the boot tong is the property marking: A8739.
Corcoran Company Paratrooper Boots, above left and right photo.
The boots pictured above have 12 eyelets for laces and were produced in a russet brown leather. These boots were
produced by the Corcoran Company. On the inside of the boots the property marking: Tomas B. Robinson 21307805.
442nd Troop Carrier Group Unit History, above left and right photo.
The two unit histories pictured above are for the 442nd Troop Carrier Group. Each book contains pictures of each member
of the 303rd, 304th, 305th and 306th Troop Carrier Squadrons. Two versions were produced as pictured above.